WEEK 9

ART AND TECHNOLOGY

(14 - 20 May, 2020)

 

Presented for the first time in the fall of 2018, Mat Chivers' Migrations exhibition will have been the most complex art project carried out by the Musée d'art de Joliette. At the source of this project is the intuition that touch, which allows us to enter directly in relation with our environment, is a fundamental sense without which artificial intelligence will never really be able to understand the human experience.

 

It was in 2017 that the exhibition's curators, Jean-François Bélisle and Anne-Marie St-Jean Aubre, invited English sculptor Mat Chivers to take up a production residency in Quebec to create a new body of work in dialogue with Montreal's booming artificial intelligence community. It was not the technological prowess that made Migrations interesting, but rather the broader issues it raised: how will developments in artificial intelligence primarily affect our lives? How do they help us identify what is proper to human beings?

 

For this ninth week of Quarantined Museum, we spark your inspiration by inviting you to think about art and technology. How do art and technology confront or complement each other? Is low-tech better suited to the visual arts than high-tech? What does technology allow that art does not and vice versa?

 

 

Presented for the first time in the fall of 2018, Mat Chivers' Migrations exhibition will have been the most complex art project carried out by the Musée d'art de Joliette. At the source of this project is the intuition that touch, which allows us to enter directly in relation with our environment, is a fundamental sense without which artificial intelligence will never really be able to understand the human experience.

 

It was in 2017 that the exhibition's curators, Jean-François Bélisle and Anne-Marie St-Jean Aubre, invited English sculptor Mat Chivers to take up a production residency in Quebec to create a new body of work in dialogue with Montreal's booming artificial intelligence community. It was not the technological prowess that made Migrations interesting, but rather the broader issues it raised: how will developments in artificial intelligence primarily affect our lives? How do they help us identify what is proper to human beings?

 

For this ninth week of Quarantined Museum, we spark your inspiration by inviting you to think about art and technology. How do art and technology confront or complement each other? Is low-tech better suited to the visual arts than high-tech? What does technology allow that art does not and vice versa?